Open Source Time Management Software – timeEdition is Perfect

timeEdition

For years I used TimeSlice on my Macintosh (it’s a cross-platform app though) for tracking my freelance hours.  It was simple, easy to setup for jobs and printed out a nice report for my clients to see.  However, it wasn’t open source.  It wasn’t expensive either, really, but I like the idea of using an OS app that I can contribute to if needed both in terms of feedback or code edits for improvement.  Having updated my version of Mac OS  somewhat recently, it was time to look for a good replacement.  I found something I think I’m coming to like even more than my trusty old TimeSlice app.  timeEdition.

This little app (and Dashboard widget if you are so inclined) does all I need it to do and more.  With it, I can setup clients, projects, tasks and the rates applied to each of these tasks.  The ability to specify a different rate for simpler tasks is something I valued a great deal in TimeSlice.  With TimeSlice, you had to have a file for each client – not so for timeEdition.  I can shift between clients and tasks in one simple (and small) interface.  See this screenshot provided by the developer –

timeEdition Version 4.x

Note that there are multiple windows shown here, but that’s just to give you the different color options really.  Note also that this app is cross-platform, too.  There’s a Macintosh, Windows and Linux version!  Very nicely done.

manage your projects with timeEditionAnother feature I found extremely useful is the ability to select where the database file and backup file one can create are stored on your computer.  I chose to put mine in a DropBox folder so that I could have assured backup and potentially do work on another machine if needed.  I had configured some clients, projects and tasks before changing my database location over though and these items were not automatically moved to the new location.  Beware of that.  It was a pretty simple process to find the default location and import my data into the new database, too, but that’s really the only complaint I can make about this very well laid out and simple tool.  The reporting is more than sufficient for my needs too.

If you are in need of a time logging tool, I highly recommend timeEdition.

 

Mac OS X Lion Invoicing Software — “Invoicing”

As I have written earlier, I somewhat recently upgraded to Lion on my Macintosh and dumped my ancient version of QuickBooks for iBank.  One feature missing in this otherwise fantastic piece of software is the ability to create and print an invoice.  I sampled several invoicing apps in the Mac App store and debated even trying this rather inexpensive app simply called “Invoicing” but am really quite happy with it. For an application that is less than $5.00 USD, this thing is an incredible bargain and does all I ever need an invoicing program to do.

The latest version, 3.01, has plenty of features for my small business needs.  I can quickly enter line items, apply a discount if needed, bill for partial hours, customize which columns are displayed and choose from a few different templates for look and feel.  The app also has some reporting tools, which honestly I don’t see using, but they may be of value to others.  The application did not get a very good rating for its earlier versions and as such, is still rated only 2 out of 5 stars in the Mac App Store.   I’m glad I decided it was worth more than just a glance, it’s a great little app that does exactly what I need it to do.