LastPass – Better than KeePass?

LastPassI’ve been giving LastPass a try for about a month now as a replacement for KeePass, and so far it’s a keeper.  It does more of what I need it to do, and does it better.  For those of you that may not know what either tool does, these are password safes that keep an encrypted version of all of your passwords.  You just need your master password to gain access to a file that holds all of your important passwords.  Keeping complex passwords that are unique to each site or usage is a vital way of protecting your finances and identity.  These tools make that difficult task manageable and simpler.

lastpassSo what does LastPass do that KeePass does not?  Let’s start by talking about that.  LastPass works as a browser plugin that interacts with an encrypted file that is stored on your computer, and syncs the encrypted file with the LastPass servers for use on all of your devices.  Only encrypted data is shared via the Internet.  In a sense, LastPass does what I do with KeePass using DropBox natively.

LastPass does more though.  With LastPass, you can save a profile for auto completion of forms, monitor your credit, hold secure notes, and share safely your data with other LastPass users (like your spouse or family).  Both tools will generate complex passwords for you, but LastPass does it within your browser and in a simpler fashion.

Using LastPass is easier for me.  With the credit monitoring feature, and with the very reasonable annual fee, I can also have an app on my iPhone and iPad that syncs all of my passwords, too.  But perhaps the most important thing that LastPass does that KeePass does not, is multi factor authentication.  With even the free version of LastPass, you can use Google’s free application for multi-factor authentication with your phone.  This vastly improves your security and it’s easy to use.

The bottom line, I’m sold on LastPass.  So much so, I bought  a three year subscription even though the free version really does all I need it to do.